Results tagged ‘ Edwin Maysonet ’

Official Brewers Press Release Regarding Trade of Zack Greinke

The Milwaukee Brewers today acquired infielder Jean Segura and right-handed pitchers Johnny Hellweg and Ariel Pena

from the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim in exchange for right-handed pitcher Zack Greinke. All three players will be added to the 40-man roster

and assigned to Double-A Huntsville. To make room on the 40-man roster for these additions, the team designated infielder Edwin Maysonet and

outfielder Brock Kjeldgaard for assignment. The announcement was made by Executive Vice President and General Manager Doug Melvin.

“We greatly appreciate Zack’s contibutions to the Brewers,” said Melvin. He will be greatly missed on the field and in the clubhouse. We

wish him nothing but the very best. We are also very excited about acquiring three good young players who are already on the 40-man roster. We

look forward to them joining organization and their future contributions to the Brewers.”

Segura, 22, entered the season as the Angels’ second-best prospect according to Baseball America. He began the 2012 season at

Double-A Arkansas, where he batted .294 with 7 HR, 40 RBI and 33 stolen bases in 94 games before earning a promotion to the Angels earlier this

week. Segura, who particpated in the All-Star Futures Game in Kansas City and was a Texas League All-Star, made his Major League debut on

Tuesday vs. Kansas City, starting at shortstop. His first name is pronounced JEAN (like blue “jean”).

Hellweg, 23, entered the season as the Angels’ fourth-best prospect according to Baseball America. He went 5-10 with a 3.38 ERA in 21

starts with Arkansas this season.

Pena, 23, entered the season as the Angels’ ninth-best prospect according to Baseball America. He went 6-6 with a 2.99 ERA in 19 starts at

Arkansas this season. He also participated in the All-Star Futures Game. Pena held Texas League opponents to a .222 batting average this season

and recorded 111 strikeouts in 114.1 innings.

The Milwaukee Brewers Signed…Livan Hernandez?

I’m not sitting down with an article idea to post on this. I just wanted to see the words written down so that I can stare at it and ponder what it all means.

What follows might be a bit of “stream of consciousness” writing.

First off, to be fair, he actually is probably an upgrade over a couple of the arms currently in the bullpen, and if he actually does only pitch out of the bullpen for the Brewers it would give them the true long-man they’ve been lacking since Chris Narveson’s injury and Marco Estrada’s subsequent move to the starting rotation.

Hernandez also could almost single-handedly solve the fatigue problem the Brewers’ bullpen is currently experiencing because, to be honest, I’m not sure the man ever actually expends stamina when he throws.

Sure, he exerts effort and energy, but he seemingly has the super power to absorb energy from the environment around him to maintain optimum levels in himself.

He’s the “Human Gatorade”, if I may.

He’s the “Ageless (Really, we have no idea how old dude actually is) Wonder”, if I may.

Doesn’t “Livan” translate to “Effortless” in ancient Mayan, or something? I heard that once.

I also once heard that he moves from city to city in MLB so nobody notices how he never seems to age to the point where one would normally be unable to lift their arm, let alone throw a baseball with any accuracy. Maybe he was the inspiration behind Will Smith’s titular character in the movie “Hancock”?

Well, in any event, here are his career numbers for your absorption.

175 W, 177 L, 4.40 ERA, 493 G (474 GS), 50 CG (9 SO), 3152.2 IP, 3481 H, 1655 R (1541 ER), 352 HR, 1058 BB (86 IBB), 1947 K, 77 HBP, 13 balks, 1.44 WHIP

Hernandez posses a career ERA+ of 96 (100 is league average).

All of that was done for eight different franchises over 9 different stops with 10 change of address forms for his agent to send him stuff in-season during a, to this point, 17-year career in the big leagues after being signed as a free agent following his defection from Cuba.

The team (along with a couple of national names) has confirmed the signing (first reported by Bill Hall on Twitter because he happened to run into Hernandez at the airport — of course he did!).

Now, all we can do is ponder about the meaning of this move from a metaphysical standpoint.

Oh, and we get to talk about who might be coming off the 40-man roster if Hernandez will be signed, as believed/reported, to a Major League contract.

Cesar Izturis is due back from the Disabled List today, so perhaps it’s him who goes as the tandem of Cody Ransom and Edwin Maysonet have played capably.

Then again, maybe the team is ready to simply cut ties with an underperforming player.

Maybe with the move to first base by Corey Hart, the team feels it no longer needs to retain the services of Travis Ishikawa once he’s healthy.

Maybe Marco Estrada had an as-yet-unreported setback following his rehab start last night for Nashville.

The worst situation would be if something further was found in Shaun Marcum’s elbow requiring him to miss the rest of the season.

***UPDATE: It’s LHP Juan Perez who has been Designated For Assignment to make room for Livan Hernandez.***

So now that it’s been announced, sit back, stare at that headline and consider…

“What does it all mean?”

or perhaps just

“What the hell?”

Milwaukee Brewers Uniform Number History: #29

Wondering who wore a certain uniform number all-time for the Milwaukee Brewers?

The Brewer Nation has got you covered. If you found this list on its own, head back here for the full repository after checking out this one.

#29

Larry Bearnarth (’71)
Jim Lonborg (’72)
Ed Sprague (’73-’76)
Gary Beare (’77)
Lance Rautzhan (’79)
Mark Brouhard (’80-’85)
Chris Bosio (’86-’92)
Kevin Reimer (’93)
Jeff Bronkey (’94-’95)
Gerald Williams (’96-’97)
Jim Lefebvre (’99)
Mark Smith (’03)
Gary Bennett (’04)
Julio Mosquera (’05)
Dale Sveum (’08)
Edwin Maysonet (’12)
Jim Henderson (’13-Current)

Brewers By the (Jersey) Numbers: #29 Edwin Maysonet

It feels like I’ve only written one of these articles in over a week.

That’s probably because I have only written one article (#33 Eric Farris) in the past eight days. That’s because a significant chunk of the 30′s are consumed by coaches, plus one number is unavailable (thanks for the memories, Mr. Fingers!).

All that said, let’s get right into today’s profile:

Edwin Maysonet.

There has been no bigger point of contention among Brewers fan over the past few seasons than that of how the shortstop on the team is performing.

Last year the position was manned by stalwart and lightning rod Yuniesky Betancourt. Betancourt brought relatively ineffective play, a penchant for making the routine seem incredibly difficult at times, but also a knack for coming through when you least expected it.

Yuni B. was shipped out following the 2011 season and Alex Gonzalez (who will be profiled on March 26th) was brought in to be the starter. Despite his inconsistency, the one thing Betancourt could be counted on for was answering the bell.

He started 146 games at shortstop for the Brewers in 2011. Alex Gonzalez won’t be doing that and therefore a capable backup is needed this year more than it was last year.

The thing is, the capable backup options on the 25-man roster all dried up this offseason as well as Jerry Hairston, Jr. followed his wallet to Los Angeles and Craig Counsell retired from the game altogether.

For Maysonet, opportunity is knocking loudly and clearly.

This is not just some organizational guy who continues to play at Triple-A simply because he’s been there for a while and nobody better has come along. Maysonet, 30, has seen big league time with the Houston Astros in parts of two seasons. He has started 17 games at the Major League level.

So how did he come to the Brewers anyway?

After the Astros made him a 19th round draft pick in 2003, Maysonet made his debut just over five years later on September 7, 2008. The Astros designated him for assignment to clear a 40-man roster spot in September of 2010. The Brewers, being perilously thin in the upper levels of the minors as the shortstop position scooped Maysonet up on a minor-league free agent contract which was signed in mid-December of that same year.

The Brewers have used Maysonet primarily in the shortstop role, though he is capable is playing second and even third if necessary.

He’s got the arm strength and range to play short (despite a team-high 23 errors last year), but in order to beat out fellow non-roster invitee (though 11-year MLB veteran) Cesar Izturis for the job he’ll have to contribute something offensively.

In 2011 for the Triple-A Nashville Sounds, Maysonet hit .290/.347/.386, with 111 hits in 383 at-bats. The thing holding Maysonet back though is that his batting average is what’s commonly referred to as an “empty” one. He did have 29 extra-base hits, but only three home runs. He also doesn’t run as evidenced by his two stolen bases in three attempts. As for the run production stats, he only scored 57 and only drove in 39.

In this series of profiles I am focusing on the men that have a chance to make the roster and provide a legitimate contribution either from the 40-man roster or, in this case, as a non-roster invitee. Backup shortstop is the most open competition in camp and therefore anybody in big league camp that can play the position  warrants consideration.

All that being said, and while I’m not saying that Izturis is necessarily the answer either, there is a reason that Yuniesky Betancourt was the starter all year and that when they needed a backup middle infielder in July and for the balance of the season in 2011 it wasn’t Maysonet’s number was not called.

Could he change the minds of those in charge and warrant himself a spot on the 25-man roster? Sure. That’s why he’s there. He’ll even earn some points when not playing is Izturis’ poor defense continues much longer. But the problem facing Maysonet is simply an overall lack of impact ability.

Bottom line: He’s a nice piece at Triple-A and in a short-term pinch he probably could man the post for a handful of games, but I honestly feel like it would take a major event for him to beat out yet another mercenary.

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